coolest girl you'll ever not meet probably
Desc

combeferret:

yo but this says so much about rape when a woman would literally rather be around a murderer than a rapist

sosa-parks:

When a girl says “Make me” that’s secret code for “fuck the shit outta me until I can’t walk or talk straight”

boychic:

"im not racist i hate everyone equally" yeah, hey buddy how’s the sixth grade goin

britney2007spears:

yes, i am a hipster :-), have you heard of lana del rey?? probably not.

gabeweb:

Lana Banana - Born to Suffer (The Lesbian Edition)

gabeweb:

Lana Banana - Born to Suffer (The Lesbian Edition)

roachpatrol:

i can’t get over how sad and funny it is when you see a teenage boy being real snotty about what he finds sexually attractive like oh no he doesn’t like bright lipstick and gladiator sandals make you look like a whore 

like buddy sorry you are not some kind of sexual wine connoisseur you are sixteen and would probably fuck a grapefruit

dedicateddrakefan:

why do i ball so fucking hard tho :-/

sheer-powder:

“We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 
A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.
To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.
For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.
I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. ”
—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool 

sheer-powder:

We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 

A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.

To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.

For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.

I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. ”

—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool 

Fucking insomnia :(
a white girl at 11pm (via jerkofficial)

yrrard:

salty-centipede:

Draco’s picture on the Black family tree makes me laugh so much though

image

what is that hat why are you wearing that omg 

image

urbanoutcritters:

i’m gonna be the chillest parent ever when it comes to my kid’s clothes
u wanna wear band tshirts and red lipstick? hell yeah. u wanna wear floral skirts and hockey jerseys? cool man, if that’s what u want. you wanna wear fedoras and rage comic shirts? well actually,

boxedjellyfish:

I wish my whole vocab was as great as this line

boxedjellyfish:

I wish my whole vocab was as great as this line

the shade in this photo set could cause an eclipse